KYLIE BANYARD

_S8A5076

BIOGRAPHY

Kylie Banyard is a multidisciplinary artist and educator. Her artistic practice is grounded in painting and intersects with photography, video, sculpture and immersive architectural spaces. Banyard was included in The National 2019: New Australian Art at the Museum of Contemporary Art Australia and recently completed a VR Studio with Tactical Spacelab (funded by the Australia Council and Arts NSW). She has been included in significant group exhibitions including Art from Down Under: Australia to New Zealand, Turchin Center for the Visual Arts, North Carolina (2018); Another Green World, The Western Plains Cultural Centre (2017); The Mnemonic Mirror, Griffith University Art Museum, Brisbane, and UTS Gallery, Sydney (2016-2017).

Banyard has received competitive funding from Arts NSW and the National Association for the Visual Arts, as well as postgraduate research grants including the Australian Postgraduate Award from the University of NSW and the COFA, UNSW Travel Grant. She has been the recipient of several competitive artist’s residencies, such as the Cité International des Arts Paris, France and the Firstdraft Emerging Studio Residency Program, Sydney.

Banyard has been a  finalist in the Arthur Guy Memorial Painting Prize, the Ravenswood Australian Women’s Art Prize and was awarded the National Tertiary Art Prize and The Basil and Muriel Art’s Scholarship, Art Gallery of NSW. She has a PhD in Fine Arts from the University of NSW and is a Lecturer of Visual Art at La Trobe University. Banyard’s work is held in numerous public and private collections including Artbank, Australia.

ARTIST CV

DOWNLOAD PDF

WORKS

CONTACT GALLERY FOR PRICE INFORMATION

PAST EXHIBITIONS

PAST EXHIBITIONS

HOLDING GROUND

11 TO 29 NOVEMBER 2020

EXHIBITION TEXT

Holding Ground continues Kylie Banyard’s exploration of alternate models for living and learning. Her work explores and brings to a new audience the radical pedagogies of American mid-20th century art school Black Mountain College. Those pedagogies are based in practices of care for others, the development of the whole person, and care for community and environment. The paintings in this exhibition focus on a small group of archival photographs in which female artists and students are engaged in intimate exchanges and moments of co-creation, responsive to the wild mountainous land surrounding them: farming, making, reading and dancing. Banyard combines archival research with fantasy, drawing on images and ideas from the past, bringing them into the present through a painting process that conflates and overlays facets of her own domestic space and lived experience with Black Mountain College’s historical record – her paintings propose a present that is thick with remembrances of the past.

EXHIBITION REVIEW

In Kylie Banyard’s newest paintings the mood is simultaneously mystical, technicolour, strangely nostalgic and enduringly hopeful. While her latest oil and acrylic works emerged from interests in the experimental American art school Black Mountain College, which in the 

mid-20th century emphasised holistic learning, this isn’t necessarily clear. Yet the aura of the influence is apparent, particularly in the most compelling paintings that depict women working together in acts of toil and farming, their skin tinged by vivid pinks and blues, blending into the environment in which they work. Existing in luminous lighting, the women’s movements are choreographed in ways that feel caring and reciprocal, not exploitative or competitive.

For an artist with a practice across many mediums, it’s clear Banyard knows painting: colours expertly morph into one another; shaded and flattened areas are designed for maximum impact; a single painting of a house is masterfully skewed, drifting on a pink background, curiously emerging as both a relic from the past and a dream of the future. Alongside the paintings are textile and sculptural forms, yet these don’t quite enhance the atmosphere the paintings so brilliantly conjure − a reverie on labour and creation, and women being with women.

Tiarney Miekus 'Galleries' in The Age Saturday 21 November, p 9 (Spectrum)

 

ARTIST IN CONVERSATION WITH CURATOR AND WRITER AMELIA WALLIN

THE IMPROBABLE OUTSIDE

28 FEBRUARY TO 18 MARCH

EXHIBITION PREVIEW

In the introduction of Architecture from the Outside Elizabeth Grosz refers to the outside as "the place one can never occupy fully or completely, for it is always other, different, at a distance from where one is." (Grosz, 2000, p.16) She talks about the unexpected and liberating joy of "outsideness" as being able to see what one might not be able to see from the inside. Grosz's proposition is not particularly comforting or reassuring, but it is alluring and it appeals to the utopian imaginary. This group of paintings occupies an affectual reckoning of Grosz's "outsideness". In the process of making these works I've tried to hover somewhere else for a while, in a state of unknowing, to make paintings in a more intuitive way. There are associations with works I've made in the past but the connections are casual and have become obscured.

EXHIBITION PRESS Link to Art Almanac Exhibition Preview here

 

NEWS

Screen Shot 2021-07-01 at 10.58.19 am

KYLIE BANYARD & AMBER WALLIS EXHIBITION REVIEWED BY ‘ARTIST PROFILE’ ONLINE

Amber Wallis & Kylie Banyard By Artist Profile A new show at Nicholas Thompson Gallery follows from Amber Wallis and Kylie Banyard’s success with ‘The Heroine Paint’ at Lismore Regional Gallery. In this latest exhibition, Banyard and Wallis paint into being both feminist histories and utopian futures, using the canvas as a foundation from which…

Screen Shot 2021-06-05 at 2.59.25 pm

AMBER WALLIS & KYLIE BANYARD JOINT EXHIBITION ‘THE HEROINE PAINT’ AT LISMORE REGIONAL GALLERY 12 JUNE TO 1 AUGUST 2021

This exhibition brings together the work of Amber Wallis and Kylie Banyard, highlighting their visions of painterly utopia. Their work pays homage to American Abstract Expressionism of the 1940s and 50s, which strove towards an alternative image for art and painting. Spontaneity stood at the centre of this, and a purist’s distillation of materials. The…

Screen Shot 2021-01-19 at 12.01.21 pm

KYLIE BANYARD EXHIBITION AT CASTLEMAINE ART GALLERY UNTIL 31 JANUARY

The first exhibition in CAM’s Orbit program; a series of exhibitions by artists who live and work in Central Victoria. Kylie Banyard’s practice is grounded in painting and intersects with photography, video and sculpture, as well as fields such as architecture and education. In her work, she explores the utopian imagination and the history of experimental models…

Screen Shot 2020-11-21 at 10.33.06 am

KYLIE BANYARD EXHIBITION REVIEWED IN ‘THE AGE’ BY TIARNEY MIEKUS

In Kylie Banyard’s newest paintings the mood is simultaneously mystical, technicolour, strangely nostalgic and enduringly hopeful. While her latest oil and acrylic works emerged from interests in the experimental American art school Black Mountain College, which in the mid-20th century emphasised holistic learning, this isn’t necessarily clear. Yet the aura of the influence is apparent,…

Screen Shot 2019-09-08 at 12.53.42 pm

KYLIE BANYARD IS A FINALIST IN THE ARTHUR GUY MEMORIAL PAINTING PRIZE 2019 AT BENDIGO ART GALLERY

Kylie Banyard ‘Lady Macbeth in Boone’ 2018 oil and acrylic on canvas 127 x 183 cm⁣ Exhibition current 14 September to 8 December 2019⁣  

0F955885-8C63-450E-8BDB-1245338E1CB5

KYLIE BANYARD’S INSTALLATION ‘MODES OF ASSOCIATED LIVING’ EXHIBITED AT THE MUSEUM OF CONTEMPORARY ART, AUSTRALIA AS PART OF ‘THE NATIONAL 2019: NEW AUSTRALIAN ART’