Top

Past

2017:

MILES HALL: elsewhere - 19 AUGUST TO 10 SEPTEMBER 2017

MILES HALL

elsewhere

19 AUGUST TO 10 SEPTEMBER 2017

ARTIST BIOGRAPHY

Montpellier based Miles Hall has held solo exhibitions in Sydney, Brisbane, Paris and Krakow. He holds a Doctor of Philosophy from the Queensland College of Art, Griffith University (2010), a Diplôme National Supérieur d’Expression Plastique (DNSEP) Ecole Supérieure des Beaux-Arts, Montpellier, France (2005), a Bachelor of Fine Art (Painting Major) from the Queensland College of Art, Griffith University (1997) and a Diploma of Fine Art (Painting and Drawing) from the The Julian Ashton Art School, Sydney (1995) where he was the recipient of the John Olsen Scholarship. He is currently a lecturer in Painting and Drawing at l’Ecole Supérieure des Beaux Arts, Montpellier ESBAMA. His work is held in the collections of the Australian Government’s Artbank; Shakespeare and Company, Paris, France; Polish Art Foundation, Poland; Shandong University, China; Ecole Supérieur des Beaux-Arts, Montpellier, France; the Australian Catholic University and several regional and tertiary collections in Queensland, Victoria and New South Wales.

ARTIST STATEMENT

Through the manipulation of coloured pigment on a flat surface the art of painting has a remarkable way of letting things emerge – giving permanence to the ephemeral encounter between gesture, surface and colour. Inspired by the physical and chromatic properties of my chosen pigments, these paintings are developed intuitively and evolve from both a retinal and sensual engagement with form and the physical handling of material. Like a good margarita pizza, these paintings are made with an economy of means for maximum impact. Each ingredient that holds the work together is an essential component – notably the texture, weave and colour of the linen, the milky constituency and absorbency of the casein ground and finally the physical and chromatic qualities of the pigment and its suspension in linseed oil. A concern for the ‘stuff of painting’ has been considerably augmented via the fabrication of my own paint – a process that, like cooking, has furthered my understanding of materials, enabling me to highlight the unique properties of each colour.

I have always been fascinated by the horizon; the way it draws us (inwardly and outwardly) towards a mysterious, un-nameable point – a paradoxical experience of a limit without an end.

EXHIBITION WORKS 190 x 150 CM

EXHIBITION WORKS 150 x 120 CM

 

EXHIBITION WORKS 46 x 38 CM

EXHIBITION WORKS 35 x 27 CM

PRICES EXCLUDE GST

ALUN LEACH-JONES: SYDNEY CONTEMPORARY - 7 TO 10 SEPTEMBER 2017

ALUN LEACH-JONES

SYDNEY CONTEMPORARY

7 TO 10 SEPTEMBER 2017, CARRIAGEWORKS

EXHIBITION STATEMENT

I am delighted to present this exhibition of new work by Alun Leach-Jones at Sydney Contemporary 2017. This exhibition is significant as it coincides with the artist’s eightieth year, and the fiftieth anniversary of his first exhibition in Sydney.

Alun Leach-Jones (1937) has held more than 82 solo exhibitions since 1964. His work has been included in significant group exhibitions including The Field at the National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne (1968) and the Bienal de Sao Paulo, Brazil (1969). Survey exhibitions of Leach-Jones’ work have been held at Lalit Kala Academy, New Delhi, India (1974), Monash University Gallery, Melbourne (1976), Kunstlerhaus Bethanien, Berlin, Germany (1981) Glyn Vivian Art Gallery, Swansea, Wales (1992), Geelong Art Gallery, Victoria (1995) and Newcastle Region Art Gallery, New South Wales (2007).

Leach-Jones is represented in the collections of the National Gallery of Australia, Canberra; the National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne; the Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney; the Queensland Art Gallery, Brisbane; the Art Gallery of Western Australia, Perth; the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York; the Museum of Modern Art, New York; National Museum of Wales, Cardiff; British Museum, London and Walker Art Gallery, Liverpool.

Nicholas Thompson

CATALOGUE ESSAY

“I assure you no art was ever less spontaneous than mine. What I do is the result of reflection and study of the great masters; of inspiration, spontaneity, temperament — temperament is the word — I know nothing.” Edgar Degas in conversation with George Moore and quoted by Moore in Impressions and Opinions (1891)

About 700 BCE, the ancient Greek poet Hesiod wrote his Ἔργα καὶ Ἡμέραι’ (Works and Days) as a long didactic poem in praise of labour, the virtue of constant application and the need for justice. The most famous part of the poem deals with a series of mythological digressions, such as the story of Prometheus and Pandora and the five ages of humankind.

Hesiod is one of Alun Leach-Jones’ favourite poets and the Work and Days is a series of paintings which the artist has undertaken inspired by Hesiod. The paintings are not figurative nor can they be linked in any manner with specific passages in Hesiod, but praise of constant devotion and the idea that work and personal application as keys to success are common ideas to the poem and paintings.

Leach-Jones is a very consistent, methodical and exacting artist who, like Edgar Degas before him, works diligently and precisely from preconceived, developing ideas rather than depending on inspiration, spontaneity and the quirks of temperament. When he was twenty-three years old, in 1960, Leach-Jones moved from his native Britain to Adelaide, where he continued his art studies at the South Australian School of Art which, under the leadership of Paul Beadle, was reconfiguring itself into a modernist art school with teachers from continental Europe and the United States. These included Udo Sellbach and Karin Schepers from Cologne in Germany, and Charles Reddington from Chicago.

In the prevailing trends of abstract art in Australia in the sixties, some artists were drawn to gestural abstraction, sometimes called Abstract Expressionism, while others were attracted by geometric abstraction. Leach-Jones, through temperament, was ill-suited for the former and was drawn towards the latter. Through a chance circumstance, while still in England, he had received an apprenticeship with the Solicitors Law Stationery Society Limited in Liverpool, where he was trained in calligraphy and the traditional, painstaking process of illumination for legal documents. These skills of meticulously working on surfaces were brought to his painting. Whereas some of the emerging modernists tapped into the tradition of gestural calligraphy, sometimes with the conscious heritage of ‘Zen calligraphy’, and viewed Ian Fairweather as a significant trailblazer, Leach-Jones adapted the cool and detached traditions of illumination and developed a peculiar and idiosyncratic style for his own concept of nonfigurative painting.

While much of geometric abstraction is preoccupied with purely formalist concerns, such as resolving problems in Euclidian geometry or the relationship of colour values within intersecting planes of colour, Leach-Jones in his hardedge paintings, which usually contain geometric rather than organic forms, explores philosophical, poetic and humanist concerns. They are paintings that can be described as possessing a narrative, but it is not a narrative that is verbal – it bypasses language – and is expressed through purely visual forms.

The Work and Days paintings are clever, lyrical and evocative. Some have a labyrinth-like compositional complexity and a colouristic richness, but there is also a breathing ease and simplicity. There is an immediate visual impact but, as your eye enters the work, you engage in complex visual games that explore different types of spatial constructions that are of considerable sophistication and intricacy. The backgrounds in these paintings are often as complex as the main structures, so that the whole canvas appears like a story within a story and the whole surface punctuated with allegory and allusion.

Hesiod’s great poem, on one level, can be read as a long didactic poem where the poet instructs his brother Perses in the agricultural arts and in the Works and Days presents a farmer’s almanac. However, once one has moved beyond this literal and obvious level of interpretation, the poem opens up as a discourse on the whole philosophy of being. The literary digressions generate a discussion on the purpose of being, present the profound beauty of Greek mythology and offer an exposition on ethics, with a condemnation of greed and violence and praise for the law of justice.

Leach-Jones’ paintings operate in a similar manner. There is an immediate and fairly obvious reading of the composition in terms of formal elements, but then the layering of levels of interpretation are revealed as colours and shapes develop a strong, pure, yet subtle voice and suggest different paths that the mind and eye can follow. In many ways, they are highly meditative, contemplative pieces that possess a spiritual presence in a transcendental sense of the word. Like an inspired passage of music, these paintings have the power to lift you out of a purely terrestrial plane of thought and existence to a different plane of experience.

A 12th-century French cleric once wrote, “Thus, when out of my delight in the beauty of the house of God – the loveliness of the many-coloured gems has called me away from external cares, and worthy meditation has induced me to reflect, transferring that which is material to that which is immaterial, on the diversity of sacred virtues: then it seems to me that I see myself dwelling as it were, in some strange region of the universe which neither exists entirely in the slime of earth nor entirely in the purity of heaven; and that, by the grace of God, I can be transported from this inferior to that higher world in an anagogical manner.”

I find that Leach-Jones’ Work and Days paintings also possess the beautiful power to transport us to a higher level of existence.

 

Sasha Grishin

 

WORK AND DAYS

 

ADDITIONAL WORKS

PHILJAMES: PIANO TEEF - 22 JULY TO 13 AUGUST 2017

PHILJAMES

PIANO TEEF

22 JULY TO 13 AUGUST 2017

Philjames has held solo exhibitions since 2010. He has a Bachelor of Fine Arts (Printmaking) from the National Art School, Sydney (2002). Philjames’ work has been included in group exhibitions in Sydney, Melbourne, Newcastle, Adelaide and internationally in Christchurch NZ, New Orleans USA and Beijing China. A monograph on Philjames was published in 2014. He was awarded the Art Incubator Foundation Grant (2015), a Creative Industries Fund Development Grant, CAL (2011) and an Australian Cultural Residency, Beijing, China (2010). Philjames has been a finalist in the Hazelhurst Art on Paper Award (2017), The Blake Prize (2014, 2005), The John Fries Memorial Art Prize (2012) and The Brett Whiteley Travelling Art Scholarship (2006, 2005).  He is a finalist in the 2017 Sulman Prize at the Art Gallery of New South Wales. Philjames work is held in the collection of Artbank.

 

For Philjames’ first Melbourne excursion he has bought together a collection from his oeuvre in the form interventions on vintage offset lithographs, original paintings and sculpture. These interventions are immediately playful taking reference from popular films, comics and television with a predilection for science fiction. The result is a kind of ‘speculative history’ or perhaps the imagining of a history in a parallel universe, one where things are at once familiar, yet bizarre.

The titular works in Piano Teef are presented as a homage to the cartoons of his youth. The reworkings of the characters are not mere facsimiles or pointed observation of the slapstick tradition. Here they are steeped in anxiety, a direct reaction to the collective shock of recent global events. They contemplate the bewilderment at the election, and ongoing Presidency, of Donald Trump, or the move to excise the United Kingdom from the European Union.

The larger collection of works in the show are a continuation of Philjames 2015 exhibition ‘Yellow Peril’. Rather than the xenophobic attitudes of 19th century Europeans toward the people of East Asia, for which the term was coined, ‘Yellow Peril’ contemplates an idea of the West becoming consumed by their devotion to false idols, the type previously reserved for a higher belief system. Grotesque hybrids of the Simpsons, SpongeBob SquarePants, Pikachu become our most revered religious icons, our nourishment, our history, and our legacy. What is particularly unsettling about these works is not necessarily the grotesqueness of the interventions, but the cool normalcy of the underlying painting. There is a sense that everything is fine, where it is clearly not.

The show is rounded out by a selection of works loosely referred to as the ‘Smilex’ series. These are the quintessential works in Philjames’ oeuvre. The four pieces have a distinctly sci-fi theme to them. Two of the works feature large headed humanoids, which recall the classic alien menace from the Golden Age of science fiction. Instead of menacing puny Earthlings, they enjoy a drink together. This simple intervention in such a historical setting throws time, space, and the idea of future into question, evoking that most classical sci-fi introduction “a long time ago in a galaxy far, far away”. The last two works imagine Astro Boy’s brother Atlas as a hulking giant (in a somewhat cheeky nod to Francisco de Goya), and a lone astronaut witnessing the entry of a meteor signalling an imminent end to life as we know it. Each of the works in this show are imbued with humour and introspection that is distinctly Philjames.

Tristan Chant 2017

 

WORKS

 

BRUNO LETI: ASSONANCES - 24 JUNE TO 16 JULY 2017

BRUNO LETI

ASSONANCES

The ASSONANCES series of works explores past masters, and proposes construction and subtraction in the same register of looking. I am conducting a dialogue with the paint on canvas, and paint and print on paper. I enact time in these works in their manner of making: repeated and continuous meticulous strokes of the brush, like the technical virtuosity of the conductor with the baton. Revelation is simply the physical act of applying one colour over, or adjacent to another colour. At times the layer beneath still shows, resonating like a dark bass chord in a piece of music. I wish to render a formalism in what I see in my mind’s eye: order from chaos, and a harmony of the soul. I am in tune with the Romantic tradition and the traditions of the East, mapping out the topographies of the mind and spirit.
 “In Assonances Bruno Leti invites us to ‘listen’ to his representations of seeing through material practices. For decades now, the practice of locating oneself in the world geographically, culturally, aesthetically – through language, form and history; is Bruno Leti’s everyday exercise.”  Extract from Fernando do Campo exhibition preview in current Art Almanac. Full version online here
Bruno Leti was born in Roccantica, north-east of Rome. He emigrated with his family to Australia in 1952. Leti studied fine art and trained as a teacher at University of Melbourne, Monash University and RMIT University. He taught art in Australia and Canada and travelled extensively internationally, eventually returning to Australia to post-graduate studies at RMIT and the position of Education Officer at the National Gallery of Victoria in the 1970s. Leti has exhibited in Australia and internationally since 1968. He is represented in the national, most state, regional and tertiary collections in Australia including the National Gallery of Australia, as well as the Hirshhorn Museum in Washington DC and other important collections in Germany, Italy, Britain and Japan. Leti has won a number of major awards, including the Pollock-Krasnar Foundation Grant in New York, a State Library of Victoria Fellowship in Melbourne, and residencies at the Australian National University in Canberra, Grafica-Uno in Milan, and has been guest artist at numerous institutions.

PAINTINGS

UNIQUE WORKS ON PAPER

 

 

 

EDITIONED WORKS ON PAPER

 

ARTIST BOOKS

 

 

 

PRICES INCLUDE GST

IAIN DEAN: 1000 HEARTFELT FAILURES - 27 MAY TO 18 JUNE 2017

IAIN DEAN

1000 HEARTFELT FAILURES

27 MAY TO 18 JUNE 2017

Iain Dean wittily sums up the conundrum of contemporary art in one sentence: “I like in when they say ‘anyone could do that’… and I wish they would”…
Jane O’Neill exhibition preview in Art Collector Issue 80 2017.

 

Perth based Iain Dean completed a Certificate IV in Fine Arts at the Adelaide Central School of Arts, South Australia. He has held solo exhibitions in Perth, Sydney and Melbourne. Dean was awarded the Black Swan National Portrait Prize in 2014. He has been a finalist in the Adelaide Perry Drawing Prize (2015) and the Doug Moran National Portrait Prize (2013). Dean’s work was acquired by Artbank from Wellington Street Projects, Sydney in 2016 and the artist exhibited with Justin Hinder at The Honeymoon Suite, Melbourne in 2017.

 

JOHN FIRTH-SMITH: FULL CIRCLE - 29 APR TO 21 MAY 2017

JOHN FIRTH-SMITH

FULL CIRCLE

EXHIBITION CURRENT 29 APRIL TO 21 MAY 2017

“Firth-Smith is an abstract painter of expansive mediations in space, shapes reminiscent of boats and shorelines and object on and around the littoral zone, remembering the edges of waves, their height, wide expanses of canvases: images and abstraction from the sea and sailing; line, edge, curve, balance. They suggest emotion and play with theory… With critical notice since 1961, commercial success, exhibitions nationally and internationally, he has won many prizes, he’s in every major national collection.”
extract from Judith Pugh “John Firth Smith: New Vision” in current Artist Profile issue 38

INSTALLATION

John Firth-Smith (1943) has held solo exhibitions since 1966 in Sydney, Adelaide, Melbourne and Western Australia. His work has been included in significant group exhibitions including ‘Twenty Years of Australian Painting’ London, 1972; ‘Biennale of Paris’, 1973; ‘Sydney Harbour Bridge 1932-82’ at the Art Gallery of New South Wales, 1982; ‘The Artists of Hill End’ Art Gallery of New South Wales and touring 1995, ‘MCA Unpacked’ at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Sydney 2001. Firth-Smith trained at the National Art School, Sydney (1961) and was artist in residence at the University of Melbourne in 1983. He was commissioned to create a tapestry for Parliament House in Canberra in 1987. Monographs on Firth-Smith’s work were published in 1999 and 2006, and two documentaries by the ABC have been made on his work . Firth Smith was awarded the Georges Prize in 1972, the Sydney Morning Herald Art Prize in 1978 and the Broken Hill Art Prize in 1978. His work is in the collections of the National Gallery of Australia, all state galleries, the Museum of Contemporary Art, Sydney; the Australian Government’s Artbank; as well as numerous regional and tertiary galleries.

DOWNLOAD FULL CV HERE

 

KARLA MARCHESI: AFTER NATURE - 1 TO 23 APR 2017

KARLA MARCHESI

AFTER NATURE

1 TO 23 APRIL 2017

After Nature explores the possibilities of contemporary Vanitas painting. Broaching themes of death and temporality, these works reflect on conditions of contemporary living, cultural contrivances and the nature of human existence. Positing a radically condensed synopsis of human civilisation, these painting mise-en-scènes draw on tragic-comic, personal and idiosyncratic motifs alongside appropriations from art history, in lieu of traditional iconography attributed to the genre.

 

After Nature should be read as a body of work in search of a secular Vanitas rather than a resolved idea set. The exhibition presents two tenets of recent work: the initial iterations explore the vanities of individualism and persuasion of cultural dictates, whereas later works deviate away from the individual towards the universal.

 

Provoked by the Vanitas dictum, Vanitas vanitatum omnia vanitas (“Vanity of vanities, all is vanity), early paintings from this series such as Vanity Fair (2016), Life goals (2016) and Tension meter (2016) feature superimposed gymnasium apparatus, chains and metal poles over representations of 17th century Dutch still lifes. These impossible bouquets, a culturally constructed arrangement wherein the flora depicted cannot bloom simultaneously, allude to bourgeoning middle-class wealth and the first manifestations of market capitalism. In this body of work such bouquets act as a stand in for the absurdity and constructedness of cultural suppositions; namely measures of achievement attained by the individual, whether they ascribe to conventional beauty standards, competitive success or wealth aspirations. The inorganic punctuations formally bisecting the background vegetation allude to the impossibility of fulfilling contemporary cultural dictates with an irreverent tragicomic humour.

 

Works created in 2017 develop a language away from the myopia of individual experience contrarily adopting a hyperopic vision of human experience. Condensing past, present and future; nature, culture and universal death, motifs of circular voids, solar eclipses, celestial bodies and black holes punctuate these later works. Paintings such as The sense of an ending (2017), Deep space, small death (2017) and Eclipse (2017) present an atheistic Vanitas, with a quiet nihilist humour. Abridging the full spectrum of human experience in to three tenets, these works flout any reference to modernity and in doing so reflect on the absurdity of our current socio-cultural landscape and the temporality of our time.

Karla Marchesi

Berlin based Karla Marchesi holds Bachelor of Fine Art (2004) and Honours in Fine Art (2007) degrees from the Queensland College of Art, Griffith University, where she received the University Medal for academic excellence and the Honours Thesis Prize. Marchesi received the Philip Bacon Galleries Prize for Excellence in Drawing in 2003, enabling her to study for a semester at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts, US. Marchesi has held solo exhibitions in Brisbane, Melbourne and Sydney. In 2012 she undertook a studio residency at Atelierhaus Mengerzeile, Berlin that preceeded her first international solo exhibition at Kunsthalle M3, Berlin. She has subsequently participated in a number of international group exhibitions. Marchesi is a recipient of the 1st Prize in the Redland Art Awards (2010), the Wilson Visual Arts Award (2012) and an Australia Council for the Arts Early Career New Work Grant (2013). Her work is included in a number of public collections including The University of Queensland Art Musueum and several regional galleries.

GUY WARREN: WORKS ON PAPER - 4 TO 26 FEB 2017

GUY WARREN

WORKS ON PAPER

4 TO 26 FEBRUARY 2017

“I think of Guy Warren as a philosopher artist who uses landscape and the human figure to pose a question. Guy’s painterly language of solving the figure against the ground, the mystery of the figure in the jungle, hovering there in nature is a metaphor for a very important question about out future on planet Earth”

Barry Pearce
Emeritus Curator of Australian Art, Art Gallery of New South Wales
extract from ABC Radio National Interview 2016

EXHIBITION TO BE OPENED BY GRAHAM FRANSELLA,

SATURDAY 4TH FEBRUARY 2017, 4 TO 6 PM

Guy Warren (1921) has exhibited regularly since 1955. Following war service with the AIF from 1941-46, Warren studied at the National Art School from 1947 to 1949 under the Commonwealth Rehabilitation Training Scheme and undertook further training in London during the 1950s. Warren is a recipient of the Archibald Prize (1985), the Medal of the Order of Australia (1999) and the Australia Medal (2013). Survey exhibitions of his work have been held at Newcastle Region Gallery (1977), Cairns Regional Art Gallery (2001), University of Wollongong (2002), Mosman Art Gallery (2003-4) and S.H. Ervin Gallery, Sydney (2016). Warren is represented in the collections of National Gallery of Australia, Canberra; Parliament House Collection; Canberra; the Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney; the National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne; the Queensland Art Gallery, Brisbane; the Art Gallery of South Australia, Adelaide; the Art Gallery of Tasmania, Hobart; the Art Gallery of Western Australia, Perth; The British Museum, London; the Contemporary Art Society Collection, London and the Taipei Fine Arts Museum, Taipei.

SUZANNE ARCHER: MOVING FORWARDS, LOOKING BACK - A SURVEY - 17 TO 23 DEC 2016 / 14 TO 29 JAN 2017

SUZANNE ARCHER

MOVING FORWARDS, LOOKING BACK

A SURVEY 1969 – 2016

17 TO 23 DECEMBER 2016 / 14 TO 29 JANUARY 2017

Suzanne Archer was born in Surrey, UK and trained at the Sutton School of Art (1964). She arrived in Australia in 1965 and is based in the Wedderburn region of New South Wales. Archer has exhibited regularly since the late 1960s and is a recipient of the Wynne Prize (1994), the Dobell Prize (2010) and the Kedumba Drawing Prize (2010). She has undertaken residencies at Greene Street Studio, New York; Power Studio at Cite Internationale, Paris and Redgate Residency, Beijing. A career survey was held in 2016 at the Macquarie University Art Museum, Sydney. Archer’s work is held in the collections of the National Gallery of Australia, the National Gallery of Victoria, the Art Gallery of New South Wales, Artbank as well as significant regional and tertiary institutions.

LINK TO ‘ARTIST PROFILE’ EXHIBITION PREVIEW HERE

LINK TO ‘ART GUIDE AUSTRALIA’ EXHIBITION PREVIEW HERE

LINK TO REX BUTLER ‘MEMO’ EXHIBITION REVIEW HERE

LINK TO SALLY BAILLIEU & NICHOLAS THOMPSON EXHIBITION DISCUSSION ON RPP FM’S ‘ARTS ABOUT’ HERE

 

SUZANNE ARCHER:

THE DEFINITE AND EPHEMERAL

“It is a process of elimination and addition, constructed of the definite and ephemeral” wrote a twenty-four year old Suzanne Archer in Mervyn Horton’s seminal 1969 survey Present Day Art in Australia. (1) ‘Definite and ephemeral’ is arguably one of the most suitable descriptions of Archer’s near fifty year practice. From her collage works of the 1960s and 1970s to her imposing landscapes of the 1980s and 1990s to the meditations on mortality of the 2000s and 2010s – a handwriting of abstracted line has formed the ephemeral connective tissue that supports the definite assembled forms of letters, numbers, flora, fauna and figure.

This exhibition ‘Moving Forwards, Looking Back’ is a small survey of the last forty-five years of Archer’s career, specifically her two dimensional work, predominately her painting. In a 2002 Art and Australia article on the painters of the Wedderburn, Sydney region, Peter Pinson observed that ‘Paul Klee spoke of taking a line for a walk, Archer takes a line on a reckless, intoxicated spree’. (2) Archer’s ephemeral, abstracted line similarly links the works in this exhibition. Its genesis can be seen in the small black painted curve in the top right of the smallest and earliest work Win a trip (1969) and threads and expands through the subsequent works of 1970s and 1980s, reaching its abstracted zenith in the landscape works of the 1990s before receding as Archer’s concerns of the 2000s and 2010s became increasingly figurative. The abstracted line nevertheless endures in these later meditations, revealing an ephemeral support and process driven scaffolding containing the definite representations of mortality and identity. The idea of the perpetual motion of the line is similarly important, the most recent work Bluesu (2016) is less than a year old. Archer’s practice remains continual, constant and compelling.

In an assessment of modernist abstract painting, Rosalind Krauss argued that the most successful works operate ‘through a structure of oppositions: line as opposed to colour, contour as opposed to field, matter as opposed to the incorporeal’. (3) What emerges is the ‘provisional unity of the identity of opposites. Line becomes colour, contour becomes field, matter becomes light’. Pollock described this result as ‘memories arrested in space’, especially prevalent in the binary opposition of figure/non figure, as image is absorbed into structure. (4) I would argue that comparable relationships reveal themselves in the tensions and harmonies of the ‘definite and ephemeral’ oppositions of Archer’s practice, where letters, marks and skeletons sit in dense, painterly and ambiguous territories.

As part of the 1982 Festival of Sydney, celebrated Australian author Patrick White selected twenty works from the Art Gallery of New South Wales for an exhibition titled Patrick White’s Choice. Included in the selection was Suzanne Archer’s Kites (1978). White commented that Archer’s works are ‘not inaccessible to those prepared to merge with them’. (5) I hope this small survey of Suzanne Archer’s work will provide much for the viewer to merge with, much as her definite figures merge into their ephemeral webs.

Nicholas Thompson

1 Horton, M ed. Present Day Art in Australia, Ure Smith, North Sydney, 1969, p.14

2 Pinson, P. ‘Common ground: Four Wedderburn Painters’ in Art and Australia Vol 40 No 2 Summer 2002, p.275

3 Krauss, R. ‘Reading Jackson Pollock, Abstractly’ in The Originality of the Avant Garde and other Modernist Myths, MIT Press, Massachusetts, 1985, p.239

4 ibid

5 Verity Hewitt, H. ‘Patrick White’s choice’ in Art and Australia Vol 36 No 2 Summer 1998, p.2469

2016

2015

 

 

Processing...
Thank you! Your subscription has been confirmed. You'll hear from us soon.
Nicholas Thompson Gallery
ErrorHere