GENEVIEVE FELIX REYNOLDS

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BIOGRAPHY

Genevieve Felix Reynolds employs visual archives to explore contemporary abstractions of time and space. She exhibits regularly in Sydney and Melbourne as well as participating in group exhibitions across the United States. Her work is held in private and public collections across Australia, and has featured on the cover of Art Almanac and Art Guide magazines.

In 2020 Felix Reynolds was a recipient of the William Street Residency Program, and in 2021 the Waverley Studio Program. She is a 2021 finalist in the NSW Emerging Fellowship, through which she will exhibit at Artspace in 2022. In 2017 she completed a funded three-month residency at Eastside International (Los Angeles).

Felix Reynolds is currently completing her Masters in Fine Arts at the University of New South Wales. She has been invited to pursue visual research in Italy at the Palazzo Monti (Lombardy) in 2022.

ARTIST CV

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WORKS

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PAST EXHIBITIONS

MIMIC

9 TO 20 NOVEMBER 2021

 

For Genevieve Felix Reynolds, flattening and abstraction describe the process of painting. Her current body of work, plays on perspective, tricking the eye and prompting viewers to look twice.

Genevieve Felix Reynolds is a collector. Her items of interest range from antique figurines and kitsch crystal dolphins, to thick 1950s museum catalogues and online archives. “I have folders of images,” she says, both digital and analogue. These images are used to make collages, which are in turn used to compose her paintings. The dual use of the analogue and digital is significant, notes Felix Reynolds. “In relation to photography, the computer mimics the darkroom, but each technology forces you to think about composition differently . . . both are processes of flattening.”...

Felix Reynolds’s paintings combine the old and the new, which she says, “mimics my own mixed up folders and archives of images and objects, as well as the way in which I access this visual data online.” Composition with Ancient Fragment, 2021, combines a carved Gandharian schist from the third century with two trompe loeil paintings of images found online: a friend’s Instagrammed photo of a sawfish and Brancusi’s 1941 Bird in Space sculpture. The fish is held by someone just out of frame, and while the shape mimics the elegant curve of Bird in Space, the fish’s horrifyingly sharp “saw” nose extension is at odds with the “bird’s” smooth surface. The background “shelf” resembles an abstract with its off-centre stripe and daub of blue, further complicating the links between the seemingly disparate objects. The combination of these unlikely items recalls the curatorial experiments of Jean-Hubert Martin, who has long sought to challenge traditional museological classification strategies...

 

from ‘Genevieve Felix Reynolds: Abstracting the Archives’ by Lucy Hawthorne in Artist Profile, issue 57, p 52 - 56

Photograph Nicole Wong

 

 

GENEVIEVE FELIX REYNOLDS

 

Composition with Aperture

 

Found and handpainted brick [20th century]

Tomb of Eurysaces the baker [50-20 BC, Rome]

Industrial Chain [2020]

 

2021

oil paint, steel, objects

100 x 71 x 18 cm

 

 

GENEVIEVE FELIX REYNOLDS

 

Composition with Ancient Fragment

 

Carved Gandharan schist [3rd century AD, Pakistan]

A friend's photo of a sawfish [Kimberly, WA, 2014]

Bird in Flight, Brancusi [1941]

 

2021

oil paint, steel, objects

83 x 60 x 16 cm

 

GENEVIEVE FELIX REYNOLDS

 

Composition with chair and colossus

 

Stone bull: Iran, 518-460 BCE

Chair: Eero Saarinen, 1955

 

2021

oil paint, steel

85 x 60 cm

 

GENEVIEVE FELIX REYNOLDS

 

After Rivera, after Minkowski

 

2021

oil paint, steel

70 x 50 cm

 

 

GENEVIEVE FELIX REYNOLDS

 

Composition with Neolithic jar and beads

 

Ceramic [China, 2400 BC]

Lapis Lazuli [ Afghanistan, 2000s]

Sculptural fragment [Rome, A.D. 76–138]

 

2021

oil paint, steel, objects

57 x 40 x 13 cm

 

 

GENEVIEVE FELIX REYNOLDS

 

New Kingdom

 

Crystal dolphin [1990s, Germany]

Silver wine vessel [1279–1213 B.C, Zagazig, Egypt]

 

2020

oil paint, steel, objects

57 x 40 x 13 cm

 

 

GENEVIEVE FELIX REYNOLDS

 

Ornament

 

Castelvecchio Museum detail [1959-73, Verona]

Hand-painted cast iron doorstop

 

2021

oil paint, steel, objects

57 x 40 x 13 cm

 

 

GENEVIEVE FELIX REYNOLDS

 

Mimic

 

Glass choko [1980s, Venice]

 

2021

oil paint, steel, object

37 x 26 x 13 cm

 

LOGIC

26 SEPTEMBER TO 14 OCTOBER 2018

The tightly-choreographed paintings of Sydney-based artist Genevieve Felix Reynolds hatch multi-layered dialogues between classicism and contemporaneity; materiality and digitisation. Representational fragments of ancient artefacts are set within non-objective, geometric frameworks, conjuring complex new conceptualisations of space.

What are you exploring in this latest series?
Painting has always been about space; and its lack. Today we have new languages and technologies through which to tackle this concept. I’m interested in the effect of the digital era on our perceptions of space. A collage-like approach to geometry and the figurative allows me to play with flatness and find space behind it.

References to fragments of classical sculpture link the three-dimensional to the two-dimensional, and the old to the new, but I’m also being wry. These fragments aren’t really paintings of ancient artefacts at all; they’re paintings of jpegs, which were photographs, which were sculptures in museums, which were in old cities, which were new. My experience of most of these objects is as pictures on a screen – floating, context-less, in the great belching swamp of the Internet.

How are you engaging with history and architecture?
These are life-long interests of mine, but as metaphors they’re easily politicised. The words ‘Rome’ and ‘crumbling’ come to mind. These references in my work might be nostalgia for a mythical ideal civilisation, or criticisms directed at the world today, but they aren’t intended to have an explicit message. I prefer a muddier, amorphous approach to conceptualisation.

Like painting and photographed sculpture, architecture straddles the 2D /3D divide. The Cartesian plane makes building a breeze by simplifying space into formulae. In art school I was obsessed with a quote from Cézanne – ‘treat nature by means of the cylinder, the sphere, and the cone’. It is a slippery slope between lines and curves and buildings and bodies. If this is a sliding scale, the photographically real and the geometrically flat are cousins. And what’s the difference between figurative and geometric imagery to a machine? I’m printing my screen, slowly, mechanically, by hand.

You analogise your paintings to a screen?
The digital screen reminds me of a painting – an ever-changing window of composite data. Then again, I’m a painter, so everything reminds me of painting. My day-to-day life could be graphed as a binary of digital and physical engagements. As a metaphor for 2D and 3D spatial experiences, this fascinates me. It seems impossible to ignore the fact that this new mundane is re-forging our perception. Geometric abstraction seems more relevant than ever to our conceptions of space.

Can you walk me through your art making process?
Before painting I make digital sketches – lots – often using earlier works as starting points. One composition can generate thirty more fairly quickly – this is why elements often reoccur. Like geometric perfection, the multiple is made mundane by the computer. Turning jpegs into paint is the antithesis of this proliferation.

Painting is my last step and involves slowing down dramatically. Only one percent of the sketches become paintings. I’m staying away from mechanising the painting process with tools like tape and spray paint – for the works to be conceptually distinct from the digital they must be truthful renditions of the hand. Lately I’ve really enjoyed incorporating figurative elements into my work as it’s a welcome relief from straight lines. I listen to audio books while I paint – one painting takes about one book.

There’s a kind of remote sensuality in these paintings; the cold marble flesh of anatomical fragments like visual synecdoches reaffirming the bodily and the tangible in an increasingly immaterial era. Is this intended?
Nailed it. Pretend-flesh is weird – sensual and frigid; another dichotomy.

I’m interested in what guides your choice of colour.
Late Baroque painting is an influence because Fragonard basically solved colour, but it’s a pretty intuitive process that I’ve been experimenting with for a long time. I’m probably searching for a personal feeling. I try to find new colour combinations that feel contemporary and fresh, but meditative and potentially timeless. Heavy blue is psychologically intense. Grey pink is calm and alert. Golden brown is warm but authoritarian. Like visiting a tiny Catholic church. The chartreuse is the guilt.

extract from Elli Walsh interview with artist in Art Almanac September 2018

 

IDOL WEIGHT

4 TO 26 JUNE 2016

Sydney artist Genevieve Felix Reynolds has been working on the paintings for her first Melbourne solo show for almost a year. With a background in digital photography, her work is painstaking, combining an almost ‘photographic’ precision with an intuitive flair for colour and geometry.

Genevieve’s latest body of work Idol Weight is a series of paintings inspired by the digital age. ‘Today, our lives are abstracted, far more than they ever have been before’ she explains. ‘I wanted to make work that refers to the 2D, ever-present screen, while re-locating itself in the physical, tactile world.’ The exhibition references classical art and architecture, with a modern twist. ‘I am contrasting the weight of historic objects, against the flatness of abstraction and efficient, reproducible technologies’ the artist says.

A meticulous planner, Genevieve conceptualises each composition and colour palette as a computer sketch before applying paint to canvas. Once all of the important decisions have been made, she begins the painting process. Each work can take weeks to complete, due to the precise layering required.

Genevieve has had a busy few months finalising her first public commission at The Galeries in Sydney for Art Month, while also running Sydney artist-run gallery space Wellington St Projects with her partner Belem Lett. Her exhibition Idol Weight opens at Nicholas Thompson Gallery in Melbourne this week.

 

The Design Files

Lisa Marie Corso

Tuesday 31st May 2016

NEWS

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GENEVIEVE FELIX REYNOLDS FEATURE BY LUCY HAWTHORNE IN ‘ARTIST PROFILE’ ISSUE 57

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GENEVIEVE FELIX REYNOLDS FEATURED ON BROADSHEET IN ‘A ROOM OF ONE’S OWN: FINDING SPACE FOR CREATIVES IN SYDNEY’ BY NICOLA HEATH

Genevieve Felix Reynolds Genevieve Felix Reynolds is a visual artist fascinated by the progression of history. Or, as she puts it, “the journey of an object from something in its original context – in a temple or somebody’s home – and how that is translated over time, breaks down and reforms through photography and through…

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GENEVIEVE FELIX REYNOLDS IN ROBSON RAK FEATURE IN ‘BELLE’ APRIL 20

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GENEVIEVE FELIX REYNOLDS AWARDED 2019 SUNSHINE COAST ART PRIZE ARTIST RESIDENCY

⁣⁣⁣Judge, Alison Kubler: “Genevieve Felix-Reynolds is a fascinating painter. I love the clever dialogue between analogue painting and digital technology in this work, how the latter seemingly informs the former.” Sponsored by Montville Country Cabins and Sunshine Coast Council⁣⁣⁣ ⁣⁣⁣.⁣⁣⁣ ⁣⁣⁣‘Adobe’ was exhibited in Genevieve Felix Reynolds exhibition ‘Logic’ at Nicholas Thompson Gallery in 2018⁣⁣⁣ ⁣⁣⁣.⁣⁣⁣…

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GENEVIEVE FELIX REYNOLDS IN ‘FORECAST’ BY MARIAM ARCILLA IN VAULT⁣⁣⁣ ISSUE 27

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GENEVIEVE FELIX REYNOLDS FINALIST IN 2019 SUNSHINE COAST ART PRIZE WITH PAINTING ‘ADOBE’ AT CALOUNDRA REGIONAL GALLERY CURRENT TO 15 SEPTEMBER⁣