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2017:

GUY WARREN: WORKS ON PAPER - 4 TO 26 FEB 2017

GUY WARREN

WORKS ON PAPER

4 TO 26 FEBRUARY 2017

“I think of Guy Warren as a philosopher artist who uses landscape and the human figure to pose a question. Guy’s painterly language of solving the figure against the ground, the mystery of the figure in the jungle, hovering there in nature is a metaphor for a very important question about out future on planet Earth”

Barry Pearce
Emeritus Curator of Australian Art, Art Gallery of New South Wales
extract from ABC Radio National Interview 2016

EXHIBITION TO BE OPENED BY GRAHAM FRANSELLA,

SATURDAY 4TH FEBRUARY 2017, 4 TO 6 PM

Guy Warren (1921) has exhibited regularly since 1955. Following war service with the AIF from 1941-46, Warren studied at the National Art School from 1947 to 1949 under the Commonwealth Rehabilitation Training Scheme and undertook further training in London during the 1950s. Warren is a recipient of the Archibald Prize (1985), the Medal of the Order of Australia (1999) and the Australia Medal (2013). Survey exhibitions of his work have been held at Newcastle Region Gallery (1977), Cairns Regional Art Gallery (2001), University of Wollongong (2002), Mosman Art Gallery (2003-4) and S.H. Ervin Gallery, Sydney (2016). Warren is represented in the collections of National Gallery of Australia, Canberra; Parliament House Collection; Canberra; the Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney; the National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne; the Queensland Art Gallery, Brisbane; the Art Gallery of South Australia, Adelaide; the Art Gallery of Tasmania, Hobart; the Art Gallery of Western Australia, Perth; The British Museum, London; the Contemporary Art Society Collection, London and the Taipei Fine Arts Museum, Taipei.

SUZANNE ARCHER: MOVING FORWARDS, LOOKING BACK - A SURVEY - 17 TO 23 DEC 2016 / 14 TO 29 JAN 2017

SUZANNE ARCHER

MOVING FORWARDS, LOOKING BACK

A SURVEY 1969 – 2016

17 TO 23 DECEMBER 2016 / 14 TO 29 JANUARY 2017

Suzanne Archer was born in Surrey, UK and trained at the Sutton School of Art (1964). She arrived in Australia in 1965 and is based in the Wedderburn region of New South Wales. Archer has exhibited regularly since the late 1960s and is a recipient of the Wynne Prize (1994), the Dobell Prize (2010) and the Kedumba Drawing Prize (2010). She has undertaken residencies at Greene Street Studio, New York; Power Studio at Cite Internationale, Paris and Redgate Residency, Beijing. A career survey was held in 2016 at the Macquarie University Art Museum, Sydney. Archer’s work is held in the collections of the National Gallery of Australia, the National Gallery of Victoria, the Art Gallery of New South Wales, Artbank as well as significant regional and tertiary institutions.

LINK TO ‘ARTIST PROFILE’ EXHIBITION PREVIEW HERE

LINK TO ‘ART GUIDE AUSTRALIA’ EXHIBITION PREVIEW HERE

LINK TO REX BUTLER ‘MEMO’ EXHIBITION REVIEW HERE

LINK TO SALLY BAILLIEU & NICHOLAS THOMPSON EXHIBITION DISCUSSION ON RPP FM’S ‘ARTS ABOUT’ HERE

 

SUZANNE ARCHER:

THE DEFINITE AND EPHEMERAL

“It is a process of elimination and addition, constructed of the definite and ephemeral” wrote a twenty-four year old Suzanne Archer in Mervyn Horton’s seminal 1969 survey Present Day Art in Australia. (1) ‘Definite and ephemeral’ is arguably one of the most suitable descriptions of Archer’s near fifty year practice. From her collage works of the 1960s and 1970s to her imposing landscapes of the 1980s and 1990s to the meditations on mortality of the 2000s and 2010s – a handwriting of abstracted line has formed the ephemeral connective tissue that supports the definite assembled forms of letters, numbers, flora, fauna and figure.

This exhibition ‘Moving Forwards, Looking Back’ is a small survey of the last forty-five years of Archer’s career, specifically her two dimensional work, predominately her painting. In a 2002 Art and Australia article on the painters of the Wedderburn, Sydney region, Peter Pinson observed that ‘Paul Klee spoke of taking a line for a walk, Archer takes a line on a reckless, intoxicated spree’. (2) Archer’s ephemeral, abstracted line similarly links the works in this exhibition. Its genesis can be seen in the small black painted curve in the top right of the smallest and earliest work Win a trip (1969) and threads and expands through the subsequent works of 1970s and 1980s, reaching its abstracted zenith in the landscape works of the 1990s before receding as Archer’s concerns of the 2000s and 2010s became increasingly figurative. The abstracted line nevertheless endures in these later meditations, revealing an ephemeral support and process driven scaffolding containing the definite representations of mortality and identity. The idea of the perpetual motion of the line is similarly important, the most recent work Bluesu (2016) is less than a year old. Archer’s practice remains continual, constant and compelling.

In an assessment of modernist abstract painting, Rosalind Krauss argued that the most successful works operate ‘through a structure of oppositions: line as opposed to colour, contour as opposed to field, matter as opposed to the incorporeal’. (3) What emerges is the ‘provisional unity of the identity of opposites. Line becomes colour, contour becomes field, matter becomes light’. Pollock described this result as ‘memories arrested in space’, especially prevalent in the binary opposition of figure/non figure, as image is absorbed into structure. (4) I would argue that comparable relationships reveal themselves in the tensions and harmonies of the ‘definite and ephemeral’ oppositions of Archer’s practice, where letters, marks and skeletons sit in dense, painterly and ambiguous territories.

As part of the 1982 Festival of Sydney, celebrated Australian author Patrick White selected twenty works from the Art Gallery of New South Wales for an exhibition titled Patrick White’s Choice. Included in the selection was Suzanne Archer’s Kites (1978). White commented that Archer’s works are ‘not inaccessible to those prepared to merge with them’. (5) I hope this small survey of Suzanne Archer’s work will provide much for the viewer to merge with, much as her definite figures merge into their ephemeral webs.

Nicholas Thompson

1 Horton, M ed. Present Day Art in Australia, Ure Smith, North Sydney, 1969, p.14

2 Pinson, P. ‘Common ground: Four Wedderburn Painters’ in Art and Australia Vol 40 No 2 Summer 2002, p.275

3 Krauss, R. ‘Reading Jackson Pollock, Abstractly’ in The Originality of the Avant Garde and other Modernist Myths, MIT Press, Massachusetts, 1985, p.239

4 ibid

5 Verity Hewitt, H. ‘Patrick White’s choice’ in Art and Australia Vol 36 No 2 Summer 1998, p.2469

2016

2015